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Scientific News

FARA funds research progress

In this section, you will find the most recent FA research publications, many of which are funded by FARA, as well as information on upcoming conferences and symposiums. You can search for articles by date using the archive box in the right hand column. To locate FARA Funded or Supported Research, click the hyperlink in the right hand column. You may also search for specific content using key words or phrases in the search button at the top right of your screen. Please be sure to visit other key research sections of our website for information on FARA’s Grant Program and the Treatment Pipeline.

 


 

FRIEDREICH'S ATAXIA: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS, REDOX CONSIDERATIONS AND THERAPEUTIC OPPORTUNITIES

Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage are at the origin of numerous neurodegenerative diseases like Friedreich ataxia and Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia, with one individual affected in 50,000. This disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems, cardiomyopathy, and increased incidence of diabetes mellitus.

FRIEDREICH'S ATAXIA: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS, REDOX CONSIDERATIONS AND THERAPEUTIC OPPORTUNITIES

Frataxin, a molecule of mystery: trading stability for function in its iron-binding site

What are the structural implications for iron binding by frataxin, the mitochondrial protein whose decreased expression results in Friedreich's ataxia? Though frataxin has been shown to be essential for proper handling of iron within mitochondria (e.g. for iron–sulfur cluster and haem biosynthesis), its exact molecular function remains unclear. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Correia and colleagues. investigate the relationship between structure and function at the putative iron-binding site of Yfh1 (yeast frataxin).

Frataxin, a molecule of mystery: trading stability for function in its iron-binding site

Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Rescues the Phenotype of Frataxin Deficiency

Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the lack of frataxin, a mitochondrial protein. We previously demonstrated that frataxin interacts with complex II subunits of the electronic transport chain (ETC) and putative electronic transfer flavoproteins, suggesting that frataxin could participate in the oxidative phosphorylation.

Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Rescues the Phenotype of Frataxin Deficiency

Two New Pimelic Diphenylamide HDAC Inhibitors Induce Sustained Frataxin Upregulation in Cells from Friedreich's Ataxia Patients and in a Mouse Model

Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), the most common recessive ataxia in Caucasians, is due to severely reduced levels of frataxin, a highly conserved protein, that result from a large GAA triplet repeat expansion within the first intron of the frataxin gene (FXN). Typical marks of heterochromatin are found near the expanded GAA repeat in FRDA patient cells and mouse models. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) with a pimelic diphenylamide structure and HDAC3 specificity can decondense the chromatin structure at the FXN gene and restore frataxin levels in cells from FRDA patients and in a GAA repeat based FRDA mouse model, KIKI, providing an appealing approach for FRDA therapeutics.

Two New Pimelic Diphenylamide HDAC Inhibitors Induce Sustained Frataxin Upregulation in Cells from Friedreich's Ataxia Patients and in a Mouse Model

A high throughput electrochemiluminescence assay for the quantification of frataxin protein levels

Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease affecting 1 in 50,000 people and is caused by a GAA-trinucleotide expansion in the frataxin gene located on chromosome locus 9q13 which results in a markedly reduced expression of frataxin, a small mitochondrial protein. The exact function of frataxin is still unknown and currently there is no approved treatment available. In the near future there will be a high demand for measuring frataxin protein levels due to the development of therapeutic strategies for FRDA based on manipulating frataxin expression levels in vivo.

A high throughput electrochemiluminescence assay for the quantification of frataxin protein levels

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